Peter Scazzero, the founder of New Life Fellowship in Queens, New York, stated, “Emotional health and spiritual maturity are inseparable. It is not possible to be spiritually mature while remaining emotionally immature.”

The significance of this statement has relevance to every church leader. Part of the responsibility of leaders is to appoint additional layers of leadership within their organization, and according to Scazzero, knowing where someone is emotionally will help indicate where that person is spiritually.  That information could be invaluable in predicting a person’s effectiveness as a leader within a Christian organization.

Tim Elmore, founder and president of Growing Leaders (GrowingLeaders.com), and author of over 25 books, suggests seven key indicators of emotional maturity.

1. A mature person is able to keep long-term commitments.

One key signal of maturity is the ability to delay gratification. Part of this means a student is able to keep commitments even when they are no longer new or novel. They can commit to continue doing what is right even when they don’t feel like it.

2. A mature person is unshaken by flattery or criticism.

As people mature, they sooner or later understand that nothing is as good as it seems and nothing is as bad as it seems. Mature people can receive compliments or criticism without letting it ruin them or sway them into a distorted view of themselves. They are secure in their identity.

3. A mature person possesses a spirit of humility.

Humility parallels maturity. Humility isn’t thinking less of yourself. It is thinking of yourself less. Mature people aren’t consumed with drawing attention to themselves. They see how others have contributed to their success and can even sincerely give honor to their Creator who gave them the talent. This is the opposite of arrogance.

4. A mature person’s decisions are based on character not feelings.

Mature people—students or adults—live by values. They have principles that guide their decisions. They are able to progress beyond merely reacting to life’s options, and be proactive as they live their life. Their character is master over their emotions.

5. A mature person expresses gratitude consistently.

I have found the more I mature, the more grateful I am, for both big and little things. Immature children presume they deserve everything good that happens to them. Mature people see the big picture and realize how good they have it, compared to most of the world’s population.

Please visit www.Psychologytoday.com to read about prioritizing and seeking wisdom, the remaining marks of an emotionally mature profile.

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Rhonda is the publisher of One Christian Voice. A mother of three daughters, she lives in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. In addition to publishing Christian news, Rhonda enjoys Bible study, playing the piano, cooking and caring for (sometimes adopting!) rescue dogs.

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